Research

Recent Research


Research

  1. Klein PJ, Schneider R, Rhoads CJ. Qigong in cancer care: a systematic review and construct analysis of effective Qigong therapy. Support Care Cancer. 2016 Jul;24(7):3209-22. doi: 10.1007/s00520-016-3201-7. Epub 2016 Apr 5. Review. PubMed PMID: 27044279.
  2. Zeng Y, Luo T, Xie H, Huang M, Cheng AS (2014) Health benefits of qigong or tai chi for cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analyses. Complement Ther Med 22(1):173-86. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2013.11.010. Epub 2013 Dec 18. Review. PubMed PMID: 24559833.
  3. Campo RA, Light KC, O’Conner K, et al (2015) Blood pressure, salivary cortisol, and inflammatory cytokine outcomes in senior female cancer survivors enrolled in a tai chi chih randomized controlled trial. J Cancer Surviv 9(1):115-25. doi: 10.1007/s11764-014-0395-x. Epub 2014 Aug 28 PubMed PMID: 25164513; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4344390. Free PMC Article
  4. Campo RA, Agarwal N, LaStayo PC, O’Connor K, Pappas L, Boucher KM, Gardner J, Smith S, Light KC, Kinney AY. (2014) Levels of fatigue and distress in senior prostate cancer survivors enrolled in a 12-week randomized controlled trial of Qigong. J Cancer Surviv. 2014 Mar;8(1):60-9. doi: 10.1007/s11764-013-0315-5. Epub 2013 Oct 30. PubMed PMID: 24170679; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3945387. Free PMC Article
  5. Chen Z, Meng Z, Milbury K, Bei W, Zhang Y, Thornton B, Liao Z, Wei Q, Chen J, Guo X, Liu L, McQuade J, Kirschbaum C, Cohen L (2013) Qigong improves quality of like in women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer: results of a randomized clinical trial. Cancer 119(9):1690-8. doi: 10.1002/cncr.27904. Epub 2013 Jan 25. PubMed PMID: 23355182; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3852682 Free PMC Article
  6. Irwin, Olmstead, Breen et al (2014) Tai chi, cellular inflammation, and transcriptome dynamics in breast cancer survivors with insomnia: a randomized controlled trial. J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr 2014(50):295-301.doi: 10.1093/jncimonographs/lgu028. PUBMED PMID: 25749595; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4411534. Free PMC Article
  7. Lam, SWY (2004) A randomized, controlled trial of Guolin qigong in patients receiving transcatheter arterial chemoembolisation for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma, Master dissertation Hong Kong, China, The University of Hong Kong
  8. Larkey LK, Roe DJ, Weihs KL, Jahnke R, Lopez AM, Rogers CE, Oh B, Guillen-Rodriguez J (2015) Randomized Controlled Trial of Qigong/Tai Chi Easy on Cancer-Related Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors. Annals of Behavioral Medicine 49(2):165-176. PubMed PMID: 25124456; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4329282 Free PMC Article
  9. Loh SY, Lee SY, Murray L (2014) The Kuala Lumpur Qigong trial for women in cancer survivorship phase-efficacy of a three-arm RCT to improve QOL. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 15(19):8127-34. PubMed PMID: 25338995
  10. Oh B, Butow PN, Mullan BA, Clarke SJ, Beale PJ, Pavlakis N, Lee MS, Rosenthal DS, Larkey L, Vardy J (2012) Effect of medical Qigong on cognitive function, quality of life, and a biomarker of inflammation in cancer patients: a randomized controlled trial. Support Care Cancer 20(6):1235-42. doi: 10.1007/s00520-011-1209-6. Epub 2011 Jun 19. PubMed PMID: 21688163.
  11. Oh B, Butow P, Mullan B, Clarke S, Beale P, Pavlakis N, Kothe E, Lam L, Rosenthal D (2010) Impact of medical Qigong on quality of life, fatigue, mood and inflammation in cancer patients: a randomized controlled trial. Ann Oncol 21(3):608-14. doi: 10.1093/annonc/mdp479. Epub 2009 Oct 30 PUBMED PMID: 19880433; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2826100. Free PMC Article
  12. Robins JL, McCain NL, Elswick Jr RK, Walter JM, Gray PD, Tuck I (2013) Psychoneuroimmunology-Based Stress Management during Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer. Evid Based Complement Alternate Med 2013: ID 372908, 7 pages. Published online 2013 May 14. doi: 1155/2013/372908 PubMed PMCID: PMC3666296. Free PMC Article
  13. Wang R, Liu J, Chen P, Yu D (2013) Regular tai chi exercise decreases the percentage of type 2 cytokine-producing cells in postsurgical non-small cell lung cancer survivors.  Cancer Nurs 36(4):E27-34. doi: 10.1097/NCC.0b013e318268f7d5. PubMed PMID: 23051870.
  14. Jahnke R, Larkey L, Rogers C, Etnier J, Lin F. A Comprehensive Review of Health Benefits of Qigong and Tai Chi. American journal of health promotion : AJHP. 2010;24(6):e1-e25. doi:10.4278/ajhp.081013-LIT-248.

Resources to learn more about Qigong & Qigong Research

Yin Yang symbolWorld Tai Chi and Qigong Day Organization

National Qigong Association


Research in Progress

NIH grant – Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University – Video

Best Practice Guidelines

Working Paper on Consensus International Expert Panel Guidelines:

For Structure and Delivery of Qigong Exercise for Cancer Care Programming

(Jun 2017) 

 

Convening Members:
Penelope J Klein, PT, EdD; Professor emeritus D’Youville College, Buffalo, NY (kleinqpj@gmail.com)Master George Picard (Village of Healing and Wellness, St Catharines, ONT)
Roger Schneider, MD, F.A.O.G.C.
Byeongsang Oh, OMD, PhD, Northern Sydney Cancer Center, Sydney Medical School, Australia

Acknowledgement:
The convening panel member/authors wish to acknowledge and thank the additional expert panel members who assisted in this research. They include: Cheryl Roland Weston, White Jade Tai chi, Greensboro, NC; Linda Larkey, Ph.D. College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University; Nancy L. Mayhew, Wellness Coordinator, Cedar Crest, Inc, Janesville, WI; Nadine Buttery, Tai chi and Qigong instructor; Todd Binzen, Qigong instructor; Gerald Hopkins, MAW, University of Iowa; Peter M. Wayne, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Director of Research, Osher Center for Integrative Medicine; and Ramel Rones, Qi Gong and Tai Chi Master, Boston MA.

 

Introduction:

Qigong exercise has been an integral component of traditional Chinese medicine for millennia. Recent scientific research has validated that among its many therapeutic applications that Qigong exercise can improve cancer-related quality of life. Theoretical research suggests that it may also have a supportive role in cancer prevention and improved survival.

There are an estimated 15 million cancer survivors in the US. Approximately 15 million new cases are diagnosed annual through out the world. In China, Qigong exercise is widely used in management of cancer, however, little is known of this ancient health-promoting modality in the West. In our global world, as we become more familiar with Qigong exercises and its therapeutic potential, there is an anticipated unmet service need for Qigong programming to serve individuals with cancer.

In response to this perceived need, a panel of international Qigong instructors with knowledge of serving individuals with cancer was convened from Nov 2016 through Feb 2017. The vision of this work was to advance acceptance of Qigong exercise as a therapeutic modality within Integrative Oncology. The specific purpose of the panel work was to develop guidelines to assist in developing and delivering quality Qigong exercise for cancer care programming. The resultant resources generated as panel products are detailed in the following.

 

 

Consensus Expert Panel Products:

Expert Panel work resulted in the generation of 2 guidelines, 2 tools, and a commentary from the experts in the form of a series of statements entitled ‘Advice from the field’.

 

These include:

  1. Consensus Guidelines for structure and delivery of Qigong exercise for Cancer care programming,
  2. Consensus guidelines for establishing instructor competence for teaching Qigong exercise for cancer care classes,
  3. Screening tool for safe participation in Qigong exercise,
  4. Class participant instructions for maintaining safety during Qigong exercise, and
  5. ‘Advice from the field’.

 

Consensus Guidelines for structure and delivery of Qigong exercise for cancer care programming

 Program Philosophy

·      Healing comes from within.

·      One has the innate power to improve health and healing through thought and lifestyle choices including regular practice of mindful Qigong exercise.

·      The primary goal of Qigong exercise for cancer care is to facilitate preservation and enhancement of quality of life associated with the cancer experience.

·      Qigong exercise classes are offered to serve the whole person as complementary to traditional medical management.

·      Class activities involve gentle, mindful exercise including traditional qigong and/or therapeutic tai chi, meditation and self-massage.

·      Qigong instructor competence is integral to maximum achievement of program goals.

·      Class environment is safe and one of empowerment, nurturing, safety, and joyfulness.

 

1.     Program Administration

1.1.  Select a qualified Qigong instructor to administer classes.

1.2.  Reserve a quiet, calming class location. (Consider wheelchair accessibility and room size requirements.)

1.3.  Request intake documentation on name, contact information, and emergency contact.

1.4.  Employ a mechanism for assessing activity tolerance, special needs or safety concerns prior to class entry. This may be accomplished by interview or completion of a short screening form.

1.5.  Use of a signed waiver for liability release for the facility and the instructor.

1.6.  Provide for participant feedback and class evaluation.

1.7.  Provide accommodation for mobility and activity tolerances. (Eg. provide chairs for sitting and possibly portable cots or yoga mats for lying down, based on class activities and participant needs).

1.8.  Have a plan for emergency response and medical assistance.

 

 

2.   Program Content

2.1 Instruction in a relatively easy-to-learn Qigong/Tai chi form, one that results in immediate benefit, and one that can be modified for a range of activity tolerance challenges as well as progression of learning.

2.2 Dedicated practice of mindfulness and meditation.

2.3 Inclusion of self-massage techniques as used in Traditional Chinese Medicine

2.4 Instruction for home practice of exercises as well as how to use techniques to reduce stress and anxiety in daily life. Provision of instructions for home practice in video or written format is recommended.

2.5 Schedule class length (approximately 60 min) to provide for a short period of social peer support before and after the actual class and sufficient rest time, as needed. Class time use should be fluid and responsive to participant needs. (A sample format is 10 minutes for assembly and group discussion; 5-10 min opening meditation and warm-up exercise; 40 min combination of active exercise, meditation, and self-massage; and 5-10 min closing discussion. Closing interactive discussion might include a review of any key points from the day’s lesson, a question and answer opportunity, information on energy theory, tips for home practice and coping strategies, optional updates on research, and/or Qigong experience sharing. Note: opportunities for class interaction may occur strategically during the class.)


 

Consensus Guidelines for instructor competence in teaching

Qigong exercise for cancer care classes

 

 

1.     Knowledge Domain

1.1.  Knowledge of energy theory and energy cultivation. (Suggested concepts include 5 element theory, major meridian paths and energy gates, microcosmic and macrocosmic orbits, key acupressure points for addressing nausea and headaches.)

1.2.  Knowledge and ability to teach program content: mindful exercise forms, meditation, and self-massage. (Note: self-massage occurs naturally with exercise movements in the form of gentle stretching of the fascia, visceral massage, and gentle mechanical stimulation of articular surfaces within joints or may be applied as rubbing, tapping, body drumming or bone marrow washing, auricular massage, stroking of energy fields as in Reiki or therapeutic touch, even the vibration created from vocalization of healing sounds.)

1.3.  Skills of effective class management

1.4.  Some basic knowledge of anatomy (major joints: spine, hip, knee, shoulder and locations of major organs, as would be expected for teaching any general health and wellness Qigong/tai chi classes).

1.5.  A very basic knowledge of what is cancer and treatment of cancer in both Western medicine and Chinese medicine theory.

1.6.  Qigong can help to improve cancer-related quality of life, boost the immune system and mediate the inflammatory response.

1.7.  Knowledge of any potential harmful effects of Qigong practice for individuals with cancer and, in particular, any special considerations or activity restrictions for class participants.

1.8.  Ability to communicate with the public and other health professionals regarding (a) what constitutes Qigong in cancer care specific to your class activities, and (b) to advise participants to seek consul from other health care professionals for questions beyond your scope of practice or professional knowledge.

1.9.  Knowledge of current research on Qigong as supportive cancer care is encouraged. (suggested Internet free-access resources: The Qigong Network: http://theqigongnetwork.com, the National Qigong Association webpage http://nqa.org and PubMed online research database.)

 

2.     Psychomotor Domain

2.1.  Instructor competence in the performance of selected Qigong style(s) or form(s).

2.2.  Ability to modify exercises for varying levels of activity tolerance and any movement restrictions or limitations.

2.3.  Training in basic life support is encouraged.

 

3.     Affective Domain (demonstrate behaviors consistent with the following)

3.1 Maintaining the safety, dignity, and privacy of participants. (Note: one should adhere to strict privacy regarding any health information volunteered by participants as well as contact information.)

3.2 Teaching without ego.

3.3 Having strong empathy and a willingness to learn from the clients served.

3.4 Having a passion for the discipline and dedication to service.

 

 

 

 

 

Screening tool for safe participation in Qigong exercise

In order to maintain your safety while participating in Qigong Exercise classes, please complete the following brief screening survey. If you answered Yes to any of the questions below, then discuss same with Qigong instructor prior to joining the class.

 

o   Are you limited in your ability to engage in mild exercise (equivalent to putting away groceries)?

o   Has your doctor or health care professional advised you to limit or avoid specific physical movements or activities?

o   Do you lose your balance at times or experience dizziness or lightheadedness when bending over to pick something up off the floor or when rising from a chair?

o   Are you limited in your cognitive ability to maintaining your own safety during exercise?

 

 


 

 

Class participant instructions for maintaining safety during Qigong exercise


Please be aware that you, as a class participant, have a role in maintaining your safety during exercise participation.

 

o   Discuss any exercise concerns with the class instructor.

o   Wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothes and flat-soled, non-slip shoes to class.

o   Bring a container of water to flush toxins and for rehydration during class.

o   Only exercise within a comfortable range.

o   Choose to sit, if you become fatigued or balance is a problem during exercise.

o   Limit movement such as reaching up or bending down, if advised to do so by your health professional.

o   Limit activity such as self-massage, if it results in discomfort or you have been advised to do so by your health professional.

o   If diabetic or experience periods of low blood sugar, be sure to eat something prior to class and bring a ready sugar substance to take during class, for use if needed.

 

Tips for safe and effective home practice:

o   For home practice, follow the guidance of your class instructor.

o   Strive to practice daily

o   Calm the mind and relax prior to starting your Qigong practice.

o   Do not practice in an overly cold or hot environment (e.g. in front of air conditioning or outside when it’s cold and windy or very hot)

o   Do not consume cold drinks or frozen foods, such as ice cream, immediately before or after practicing Qigong (a warm herbal tea or room temperature drink is recommended).

o   Try to practice at least one hour after a meal (e.g., lunch or dinner), it is not good to practice when one is feeling hungry or full.

o   Avoid practicing after consuming alcohol.

o   If any exercise results in pain or discomfort, stop the exercise and discuss with your instructor or your medical consultant before continuing.

 

 

           


 

 

Advice from the field

 

·      Know your craft well.

·      Nurture, encourage, openly express the joy of Qigong practice in order to guide students to self-discover the joy in their own practice.

·      Keep it light and fun.

·      Allow your students the experience. Talk less. Listen more. You will teach your students how to practice Qigong, and they teach you to become a better teacher.

·      Only advise within your area(s) of expertise. Qigong is the focus, not medical treatment of cancer or nutritional counseling.

·      Prepare and distribute a brochure or informational handout describing your program, its philosophy and activities that your students can share with their attending oncologist.

·      Explore opportunities to defray participation cost including third-party reimbursement as health and wellness programming.

·      Accurately interpret the research. There is strong evidence that Qigong practice can improve cancer-related quality of life. At this time (Jan 2017), research evidence suggests that Qigong practice may have a role in cancer prevention and improved survival, but definitive proof of these two potential benefits needs to be assessed and verified through additional population research.

·      Each participant has a unique cancer journey. Perhaps all you need to know of cancer is that it is a collection of diseases most often manifesting as tumors. Western management may involve surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and/or use of medication. Integrative oncology adds complementary therapies. Traditional Chinese Medicine includes qigong practice and nutritional support.

·      Some students may be experiencing paraesthesia (pins and needles sensation in feet and/or hands), difficulty concentrating, pain, fatigue, nausea, sleep disturbance, and emotional distress as side effects of the cancer and its treatment. These symptoms may persist during and after treatment. Qigong can help.

·      Be aware that some of your students may be adjusting to physical changes due to surgery (e.g. mastectomy, colostomy) or hair loss from treatment. Guide them to see the beauty in their energetic selves. While the physical may be limited and less than perfect, the spirit can still abound.

·      Consider it normal that some days are better than others for your students. For many, every time they come to class is a reason for celebration. Celebrate with them.

·      Finally, your students won’t care how much you know, until they know how much you care.

 

Additional Resources

The following are offered as informational resources that may be helpful for developing and marketing of new ‘Qigong Exercise for Cancer Care Programming’.

 

For a general overview of Qigong exercise for Cancer care, see:

 

Klein, P.J. Qigong in Cancer Care: Theory, Evidence, and Practice., Medicines 2017, 4(1), 2; doi:10.3390/medicines4010002 (available online at http://www.mdpi.com/2305-6320/4/1/2 , accessed Jan 15, 2017

 

For published evidence-base references supporting utilization of Qigong exercise for cancer care, see:

 

  1. Jemal A, Center MM, DeSantis C, et al. (2010) Global Patterns of Cancer Incidence and Mortality Rates and Trends. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention 19(8):1893-907. doi:
  2. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2017. Available at: https://www.cancer.org/research/cancer-facts-statistics/all-cancer-facts-figures/cancer-facts-figures-2017.html (viewed 14 March 2017)
  3. Chinese Medical Qigong; Lui T, Qiang XM. Eds.; Singing Dragon/Jessica Kingsley Publishers: London, UK, 2010.. ISBN: 978-0-85701-017-9.
  4. Klein PJ, Schneider R, Rhoads CJ. (2016) Qigong in cancer care: a systematic review and construct analysis of Qigong therapy. Support Care Cancer 24(7), 3209-22. doi: 10.1007/s00520-016-3201-7. Epub 2016 Apr 5. Review. PubMed PMID: 27044279.
  5. Liu P, You J, Sun Y, He Y, Sit H, Jia L, Wong M, Xia Z, Zheng X, Wang Z, et al. the efficacy of Guolin-Qigong on the mind-body health of Chinese women with breast cancer: a randomized controlled trial. Qual Life Res. 2017 Apr 18; Apr 18. doi: 10.1007/s11136-017-1576-7. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 28421384
  6. Ho, R. T., Wang, C. W., Ng, S. M., Ho, A. H., Ziea, E. T., Wong, V. T., Chan, C. L. The effect of t’ai chi exercise on immunity and infections: a systematic review of controlled trials. J Altern Complement Med. 2013 May;19(5):389-96. doi: 10.1089/acm.2011.0593. Epub 2013 Jan 14.
  7. Irwin, M.R.; Olmstead, R.; Breen, E.C.; Witiarama, T.; Camilo, C.; Sadeghi, N.; Ma, J.; Nicassio, P.; Ganz, P.A; Bower, J.E.; et al. (2014) Tai chi, cellular inflammation, and transcriptome dynamics in breast cancer survivors with insomnia. Natl. Cancer Inst. Monogr 50, 295–301. doi:
  8. Yang Y, Verkuilen J, Rosengren KS, et al. Effects of a Taiji and Qigong intervention on the antibody response to influenza vaccine in older adults. American Journal of Chinese Medicine 2007;35(4):597-607
  9. Wayne PM, Berkowitz DL, Litrownik DE, Buring JE, Yeh GY. (2014) What do we really know about the safety of tai chi? A systematic review of adverse event reports in randomized trials.   Arch Phys Med Rehabil 95(12):2470-83. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2014.05.005. Epub 2014 May 27
  10. Li F, Harmer P. (2015) Economic evaluation of a Tai JI Quan intervention to reduce falls in people with Parkinson disease, Oregon, 2008-20011. Pre Chronic Dis Jul 30,12:E120. doi: 10.5888/pcd12.140413.
  11. White JD, Lin H, Jai L, Wu RS, Lam S, Li J, Dou J, Kumar N, Lin L, Lao L. Proceedings of the Strategic Meeting for the development of an International Consortium for Chinese Medicine and Cancer. (2016) Journal of Global Oncology Special Article. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JGO.2016.005710
  12. Greenlee H, Balneaves LG, Carlson LE, Cohen M,Deng G, Hershman D, Mumber M, Perlmutter J, Seely D, Sen A, Kick SM, Tripathy D; ; for the Society for Integrative Oncology Guidelines Working Group, (2014) Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Use of Integrative Therapies as Supportive Care in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer. Natl Cancer Inst Monogr 2014;50:346–358. doi:1093/jncimonographs/lgu041
  13. NIH Consensus Development Panel on Acupuncture. Acupuncture. JAMA 1998;280(17):1518-24.
  14. Filshie J, Hester J. Guidelines for providing acupuncture treatment for cancer patients–a peer-reviewed sample policy document. Acupuncture in Medicine 2006;24(4):172-82
  15. Chodzko-Zajko, W.; Jahnke, R. National Expert Meeting on Qigong and Tai Chi: Consensus Report; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: Urbana, IL, USA, November 2005. Available online: http://healerwithinfoundation.org/National_Expert_Meeting/ (accessed on 10 October 2016).
  16. Klein, P. J. Qigong in Cancer Care: Theory, Evidence-Base, and Practice. Medicines 2017, 4(1), 2 doi: 10.3390/medicines4010002
  17. Yang, Y. The Treasure Missing in Many Tai Chi and Qigong Practices. Available online: http://www.americantaichi.net/TaiChiKungLivingArticle.asp?cID=3&sID=6&article=TreasureMissing&subject=daily%20life (accessed on 21 February 2017).
  18. Chen CW. Introduction to Chinese Taiji Five-Element Qigong. Available at http://yang-sheng.com/?p=11022 (viewed 14 March 2017)
  19. Campo RA, Light KC, O’Conner K, et al (2015) Blood pressure, salivary cortisol, and inflammatory cytokine outcomes in senior female cancer survivors enrolled in a tai chi chih randomized controlled trial. J Cancer Surviv 9(1):115-25. doi: 10.1007/s11764-014-0395-x. Epub 2014 Aug 28 PMID: 25164513
  20. Campo RA, Agarwal N, LaStayo PC, O’Connor K, Pappas L, Boucher KM, Gardner J, Smith S, Light KC, Kinney AY. (2014) Levels of fatigue and distress in senior prostate cancer survivors enrolled in a 12-week randomized controlled trial of Qigong. J Cancer Surviv. 2014 Mar;8(1):60-9. doi: 10.1007/s11764-013-0315-5. Epub 2013 Oct 30. PubMed PMID: 24170679; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3945387. Free PMC Article
  21. Chen Z, Meng Z, Milbury K, Bei W, Zhang Y, Thornton B, Liao Z, Wei Q, Chen J, Guo X, Liu L, McQuade J, Kirschbaum C, Cohen L (2013) Qigong improves quality of like in women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer: results of a randomized clinical trial. Cancer 119(9):1690-8. doi: 10.1002/cncr.27904. Epub 2013 Jan 25. PubMed PMID: 23355182; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3852682 Free PMC Article
  22. Irwin, Olmstead, Breen et al (2014) Tai chi, cellular inflammation, and transcriptome dynamics in breast cancer survivors with insomnia. J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr 2014(50):295-301.doi: 10.1093/jncimonographs/lgu028
  23. Lam, SWY (2004) A randomized, controlled trial of Guolin qigong in patients receiving transcatheter arterial chemoembolisation for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma, Master dissertation Hong Kong, China, The University of Hong Kong
  24. Larkey LK, Roe DJ, Weihs KL, Jahnke R, Lopez AM, Rogers CE, Oh B, Guillen-Rodriguez J (2015) Randomized Controlled Trial of Qigong/Tai Chi Easy on Cancer-Related Fatigue in Breast Cancer Survivors. Annals of Behavioral Medicine 49(2):165-176
  25. Liu P, You J, Sun Y, He Y, Sit H, Jia L, Wong M, Xia Z, Zheng X, Wang Z, et al. the efficacy of Guolin-Qigong on the mind-body health of Chinese women with breast cancer: a randomized controlled trial. Qual Life Res. 2017 Apr 18; Apr 18. doi: 10.1007/s11136-017-1576-7. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 28421384
  26. Loh SY, Lee SY, Murray L (2014) The Kuala Lumpur Qigong trial for women in cancer survivorship phase-efficacy of a three-arm RCT to improve QOL. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 15(19):8127-34. PMID: 25338995 Free Article
  27. Zeng Y, Luo T, Xie H, Huang M, Cheng AS (2014) Health benefits of qigong or tai chi for cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analyses. Complement Ther Med 22(1):173-86. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2013.11.010. Epub 2013 Dec 18. Review. PMID: 24559833. [PubMed]
  28. Oh B, Butow PN, Mullan BA, Clarke SJ, Beale PJ, Pavlakis N, Lee MS, Rosenthal DS, Larkey L, Vardy J (2012) Effect of medical Qigong on cognitive function, quality of life, and a biomarker of inflammation in cancer patients: a randomized controlled trial. Support Care Cancer 20(6):1235-42. doi: 10.1007/s00520-011-1209-6. Epub 2011 Jun 19. PubMed PMID: 21688163.
  29. Oh B, Butow P, Mullan B, Clarke S, Beale P, Pavlakis N, Kothe E, Lam L, Rosenthal D (2010) Impact of medical Qigong on quality of life, fatigue, mood and inflammation in cancer patients: a randomized controlled trial. Ann Oncol 21(3):608-14. doi: 10.1093/annonc/mdp479. Epub 2009 Oct 30. Free PMC Article

 

 

 

For a free access to an informational video on Qigong for cancer care,

 

GOTO: http://theqigongnetwork.com